Salt and Sodium

Do I have to give up salt?

No. But most people eat more than they need. some health authorities say that sodium intake should not be more than 2,400 mg. Nutrition labels also list a Daily Value (upper limit) of 2,400 mg per day of sodium. Much of the sodium in people's diets comes from salt they add while cooking and at the table. (One teaspoon of salt provides about 2, 000 mg of sodium.)

Go easy on salt and foods that are high in sodium, including cured meats, luncheon meats, and many cheeses, most canned soups and vegetables, and soy sauce. Look for lower salt and no-salt-added versions of these products at your supermarket.

The table below will give you an idea of the amount of sodium in different types of foods. Information on food labels can also help you make food choices to keep sodium moderate.

 

WHERE'S THE SALT?

Food Groups

 

Sodium, mg

Bread, Cereal, Rice, and Pasta

Cooked cereal, rice, pasta, unsalted, 1/2 cup

Trace

Ready-to-eat cereal, 1 oz.

100-360

Bread, 1 slice

110-175

Popcorn, salted, 1 oz.

100-460

Pretzels, slated, 1 oz.

130-880

 

 

 

Vegetables

Vegetables, fresh or frozen, cooked without salt, 1/2 cup

Less than 70

Vegetables, canned or frozen with sauce, 1/2 cup

140-460

Tomato juice, canned, 3/4 cup

660

Vegetable soup, canned, 1 cup

820

 

 

 

Fruit

Fruit, fresh, frozen, canned, 1/2 cup

Trace

 

 

 

Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese

Milk, 1 cup

120

Yogurt, 8 oz.

160

Natural cheeses, 1-1/2 oz.

110-450

Process cheeses, 2 oz.

800

 

 

 

Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts

Fresh meat, poultry, fish, 3 oz.

Less than 90

Tuna, canned, water pack, 3 oz.

300

Bologna, 2 oz.

580

Ham, lean, roasted, 3 oz.

1,020

Peanuts, roasted in oil, salted, 1 oz.

120

 

 

 

Other

Salad dressing, 1 tbsp

1

Ketchup, mustard, steak sauce, 1 tbsp.

3

Soy sauce, 1 tbsp.

3

Salt, 1 tsp.

3

Dill pickle, 1 medium

4

back        next